03. Sets, props and problem solving

As he continues to provide advice on how to run your own successful photography business, Karl takes a look at sets, props and problem solving.

Here he talks about the importance of problem solving. This is a key factor in the business of photography as it means you can overcome the problems associated with that shoot and realise the concept. Problem solving helps with all aspects of photography, including set building and prop sourcing. Good props and sets are the supporting structure behind any successful image, which is what Karl also discusses here.

He explores a number of his images, looking at the problems he faced for each and how he overcame them. He also looks at the different sets he’s created and props he’s used throughout his career and explains how he achieved them.

Class objectives:

  • Understanding problem solving as a key skill for photography
  • Explore how to identify and solve problems in a shoot
  • Show why sets and props are important for creating mood
  • Provide examples of different sets for different shoots
  • Explore outside services that can help you overcome challenges for a shoot
Photography sets and props

Building sets and finding props for photography.

If you have any questions about this class, please post in the comment section below.

NOTE: This class is available with English subtitles.

Comments

  1. …and I thought clients only hired us just to make it sexy.

    Fascinating. It’s a funny one, it’s like creativity being applied at two levels, “the big idea” and “how to MAKE the idea happen” — the more I learn, the more I realise there so much more behind the just the image.

    Just goes to show, creativity is not just at the end point.

    1. Thanks Philip, and yes the whole process I consider to be ‘creative’ but in most cases it’s finding solutions that delivers results rather than just the application of ‘creativity’

  2. Love it! Fun to watch the process of finally getting the keeper shot. This makes me think of possibly having a cheap timelapse camera going off to one side just in those cases where clients don’t really appreciate the amount of effort that goes on behind the scenes. Plus it makes both possibly good marketing material (as you’re doing I’m sure) and also a record of what had to happen to get the shot if you need to do something like it again.

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