04. The Train Carriage

Sometimes the only way to shoot in the harsh midday sun is to not shoot directly under it. In this chapter Karl shoots some great shots inside an old train carriage using just the natural light coming in from the windows. Learn how to make the most out of a harsh midday sun. Think about what you’re doing and adjust your shooting positions and models poses accordingly and try not to accept that you can just fix things in Photoshop after as that just makes you lazy!

Comments

  1. Hi Karl

    Your videos are, without doubt, the best I have discovered and are a constant source of advice. I must admit that, as a beginner, I get incredibly confused by the plethora of conflicting advice I find on YouTube!

    Many photographers on YouTube tell me that I must use a Lightmeter. YOUR advice is straight forward and logical – shot images and decide what exposure suits your concept and the lighting conditions. I agree with you! You can take a dozen images to test exposure in the time it takes to get a Lightmeter out of the bag!

    But what’s your view on two other subjects? Light leaks when using a 10 stop big Stopper and the use of colour checker passports? I noticed in one of your videos (in the brilliant Iceland series) that you never cover the eyepiece to avoid light leaks. Other folk say you should!!! In your opinion, is covering the eyepiece overkill.

    Again on YouTube, there are loads of videos telling me that I should always use a colour checker as the first shot of a series, but I don’t recall ever seeing you use one. What is your advice please? Given the brilliance of your work I’d rather take your advice rather than the hoards of “photographers” on YouTube.

    1. Hi Peter, thank you for your kind words. You shouldn’t have a problem with light leaks on the big stopper itself if the sponge seal is gripping to the filter holder correctly as for light leaks through the camera viewfinder then yes theoretically this could be a problem. Some of the top pro cameras have a built in ‘blind’ that closes in the viewfinder when you flick a a switch, others have a rubber plug on the camera strap that fits in the eyepiece or you can just throw a cleaning cloth over the back of the camera etc. I must admit I don’t pay too much attention to it as I’ve not noticed a problem without them!

  2. Hello Karl. I noticed you had your reflector with you, did you intentionally not use it in order to create an artistic efect based on the difference between lights and shadows?

      1. Loving the courses, Karl. You are a genius! I also wondered about the reflector. What guided your decision in whether you needed to use a reflector or not in this case?

        1. Hi Susan, thank you for your kind words. Outdoors you will often find the reflector necessary to bounce light back into the shadows. In doors or in this case inside this carriage there was light coming in from both sides so it wasn’t essential for all the shots but occasionally it improved the lighting. I always take a couple of test shots, evaluate and then make a decision.

  3. Hi Karl. I have question about color – as you’ve said in video white balance was very warm and red , but when I look at the photo all skin tones look not natural but blue for me – is it a problem with my display (it is I think as it’s a laptop) or it is that very tone that you wanted?
    Another question – do you use your gray card every time you shoot or you can adjust white balance yourself ? I mean often we don’t have anything to start with -when we definitely know what color it should be (like white paper or gray concrete or whatever).

    1. Hi Anna, using a color checker or grey card in your first series of shots is a good idea if you are shooting RAW files as you can more easily take a reading from the grey card to then ensure the shots in that series are neutral. You can do this with a white piece of paper too as long as you don’t overexpose the white paper. Or alternatively you can just slide the color temperature dials in your software such as LR and choose what you think looks good but you would need a color calibrated monitor to do that. See our LR courses in the Post Production section for more info.

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