07. Paint explosion

This shoot is nothing short of spectacular, but not for the faint hearted! This shoot created some mind boggling complications, but applying logic and knowledge there is always a way to make an image work. Se how Karl and the team set up this impressive shoot and just how you too can perfect a paint splash image like this.

Comments

  1. Hi Karl.
    you used scrim sheets at both the sides. Shouldn’t you have used another material instead. scrim sheets would have soaked the paint, had the liquid spilled on them.

    1. Hi Ayen, the scrim sheeting is just paper on a roll and is probably the least expensive thing to replace. The type of lighting the scrim reveals is also best for glossy surfaces so my first objective is for the best lighting and result. I’ve sold the picture for much more than the cost of the scrim paper.

  2. Great ideas and superb shots! Karl, can you tell us which kind of paint are you using for these shots? I can just imagine they are water based.

    1. Hi, if the paint is not hitting a person then we use water based emulsion that you paint interior walls with. If it’s hitting a model we use kids paint from nursery schools and water it down.

  3. i just joined your website just in half an hour you changed my mindset that work should be done smartly. its fun to watch broncolor sponsor photographer using pocket flashes back then. i am loving every minute of this.

  4. Great job Karl! What shutter speed did you use? I wonder how you synchronized the Nissin flash and timing of the spill and shutter? Apart from equipment list it, would be better if you add EXIF data like the camera model, lens, shutter speed, aperture, etc. to all your shoots.

    1. Hi Waris, on a medium format camera you can sync at any speed, if I was using a 35mm camera then I would have been limited to the 1/250th sync speed, but as you would have understood from the video it is the flash that is freezing the subject not the shutter. I was connecting to the flashes with a wireless trigger on the camera and receivers on the flashes. Please check the first 15 chapters on this page to really understand studio lighting, synchronisation and flash duration. https://www.karltayloreducation.com/portrait-photography/

  5. Amazing one Karl!!! Just wanted to ask you, since you are using speedlights for the faster flash duration at low power, do you bump up the ISO and open the aperture a bit for such splash shots? Also, can the elinchrom master 600s freeze at lower power and does the distance between the lights and the subject also make a difference ? Thank you Karl.

    1. Hi Kartik, I used more speedlites to compensate for the lower power, these days cameras have better high ISOs so that would also be an option. Opening up the aperture will of course let more light in but it will also reduce depth of field. I’m afraid I don’t know the lights you are talking about so I can’t comment on them, you would need to check the spec sheets and look for the t0.1 time spec (not a t0.5) if the time is 1/5000th or faster then they should be good for this sort of shot.

    1. Hi Adrian, I felt the trigger would give only the same result (unless I adjusted the delay time for each shot). On this one I quite fancied the anticipation of the unknown!

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