Falling girl

With this highly stylized lighting look producing an emotional evocative image, Karl walks you through every aspect of the lighting and the concept to completion. He demonstrates the careful control of lighting styling, choice of outfit and how careful preparation will lead to a stunning result.

As part of our first fashion photography course, Karl set out to capture the image of a falling girl. This shoot with Deborah Frey demonstrates the entire process, from various lighting tests to outfit changes and posing adjustments. Using a simple light setup and creative problem solving Karl demonstrates how, with careful control of lighting and meticulous planning, it is possible to achieve stunning results that require minimal retouching.

In this fashion photography class you’ll learn the following:

  • Choosing an outfit
  • Creative problem solving
  • How to control shadows with different lighting
  • How to freeze movement with flash
  • What is mirror lock up mode and when to use it
  • How to get maximum effect using minimal lights

If you have any questions regarding this course use the comments area below.

NOTE: This photography class is available with English subtitles.

Comments

  1. I am so excited to have signed up for your education package. I have just watched this for the first time and it was amazing. This is going to be so inspirational and will give me the extra push to move forwards with my photography. Thank you Karl you are so generous with your knowledge and skill, a true Gent.

  2. I have been inspired by you over the years Karl, just viewed this for the first time since signing up. Very interesting set up. You must be very strong !!!!! Thanks for making this available online and at great price too.

  3. Excellent work and choice of model! Worked with Deborah before and absolutely loved her performance.

    1. Thank you Marco, yes Deborah was one of the hardest working models that I’ve had the pleasure of working with. She was as enthusiastic as I was about getting the result which is always a pleasure.

  4. This was an awesome shoot, and very informative. I remember watching the video, and thinking I will ask if you used mirror lockup, and two seconds later you mentioned that you did. 🙂

  5. having bought your specific courses previously and learning so much I’m thrilled to have signed up for the monthly subscription. This is an amazing shot, just shows the 12inchs behind the camera are what makes the shot, not the kit.

    Can’t wait to see so much more Karl, I have a well paid but stressful job that I want to leave so I can progress into my obsession which is photography, pleased with my progress thus far and a lot of it down to your workshops just hoping your tutorage and inspiration gets me along with lots of practice to where I want to be.

    Cheers dude

    Richie

  6. thank you Karl for Fashion episode. i would like to ask you:
    could you take this techniques with high quality by your 5Diii as well (and Not by Hasselblad)?

    1. Hi Art, yes of course but obviously there would be some difference in tonal range and resolution on close inspection on large format print or examination.

  7. beautiful! i have this muse i’ve been shooting and this would right up her alley! i’d LOVE to try this out! 🙂

  8. Awesome Karl, loved the way you done this shoot…this inspires all of us to be really concentrate on light positions…power and all…just i thought a flying balloons might be much more effective to that moment…

    1. Thank you Lal, I did try a test shot with the balloons in the air but I felt it was distracting from the model and i wanted to concentrate everything on her and the fall so I decided to go with the balloons on the floor, but of course these things are all personal preferences.

  9. What can I say, you are amazing Karl. Your attention to detail is unique and I feel I am learning so much every time I watch you create a shot.

    1. Thank you Paul, that’s our goal here at KTE so glad to hear your enjoying the program, please spread the word to your photography friends!

  10. Once again great work Karl, a question please? I am shooting a dancer next week in her dance studio and I am after some movement shot, jumping etc. I aim to use a low power to freeze the action as I cannot use HSS with my studio flash heads but what I would like to know please is: I will be using a 1.5m Octabox should I use the two diffusers, just the outer diffuser or none at all? I would like a little shadow to be cast on the studio floor, so I aim to have the boom stand and the light source high and angled down at 45 degrees. Sorry for the long question. Rgds Gary

    1. Hi Gary, the level of shadow you get will be dependent on how far the softbox is a away from your subject. For dancers I’d prefer a crisper look so I’d consider using it without the diffusers as it will be a harder light source with more contrast, you will also get more light out of it so you can use it more easily on the lower powers. In the future I’d consider something like the broncolor deep focus umbrella if a para133 is out of budget. Cheers Karl.

    1. Thank you David, I think you could also achieve a decent result with something like a deep focus umbrella and a honeycomb grid on a standard reflector for the background. It would take more work but still be possible to get a good result. When you look at the results we achieved in ‘Light Source’ in the ‘Portrait’ section this was all done with more basic modifiers to prove what is possible.

  11. Dear Sir

    I would like to give you special lots of thanks to you. I am Rukesh, from Nepal. I got a chance to learn from you, itts because of your online reasonable course

    Best Regards

  12. Oh I remember the “shadow” technique from your older tutorials a few years ago, there was I think glass of water falling from model’s hand etc… So cool…

  13. Totally amazed by how this shot was composed. I am looking forward to learning more and do more in the world of photography. Thanks for the inspiration and your compassion for photography. Blessings!

  14. these are not only photographs.. you are creating amazing piece of an art. i am leaning a lot from you Karl. the way you explain each element is wow. Thanks a lot is very little world. just speechless.

  15. Hi Karl,
    I’m new to photography and new to this site and I’m loving it!
    Can you explain the line you mentioned in the beginning ’18 ml equivalent to a 50 on a 35 ml format. If this is in another video,pleasen supply the link.
    Second question, whats the minimum Mega pixel needed in a camera if the images will be used for large commercial use?
    Thanks in advance!

    1. Hi Malky, thank you and I was referring to the fact I was shooting with a medium format camera instead of a 35mm camera, therefore the focal lengths of the lenses give different results so I was giving a comparison of the medium format lenses to the 35mm equivalents. As for MP I’d say at least 22mp with good lenses.

    1. Hi Niro, that’s a broad question but most wedding photographers would work with one or two bodies and lenses, my choice would be a 16-35 and a 70-200 f2.8

  16. Very impressive idea, I loved it for the simplicity, and the possibility to look the entire workflow is a great thing.
    It’s to consider one thing, for play with lights like you do is needed a big infinity wall and high ceiling to simulate a real natural light, obviously this is only a little part, without creative ideas and a clear idea of the realization all gears and stuffs is nothing.

    Great job, love your works, regards from Sicily !
    Andrea

  17. This was always one of my favourites. Karl really opened my eyes to the world of commercial photography. Now I’m dreaming of getting a Hasselblad and doing some great work myself.

    1. Hi Jupiterfry, whilst a Hasselblad renders a beautiful resolution and tonal range you can still make great pictures with 35mm cameras too.

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